William Carbonaro

carbonaro_william_small

Contact Information

William Carbonaro

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
1016 Flanner Hall
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556
574-631-3633 

wcarbona@nd.edu

www.nd.edu/~wcarbona/

Degrees

B.A., political science, Washington University in St. Louis
M.A., political science, Washington University in St. Louis
M.S., sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Ph.D., sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Honors/Awards

1997 Award for Outstanding Paper by a Graduate Student, Sociology of Education Section of the American Sociological Association

2002 Outstanding Reviewer, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis

2003-4 National Academy of Education Post-Doctoral Fellowship

Educational research interests

Sociology of education, social stratification, research methods and statistics

Select publications

Carbonaro, William. 2006. “Cross-National Differences in the Skills-Earnings Relationship: The Role of Skill Demands and Labor Market Institutions.” Social Forces 84:1819-1842.

Carbonaro, William. 2006. “Public-Private Differences in Achievement among Kindergarten Students: Differences in Learning Opportunities and Student Outcomes.” American Journal of Education 113:31-65.

Carbonaro, William. 2005. “Explaining Variable Returns to Cognitive Skill across Occupations.” Social Science Research 34:165-188.

Carbonaro, William. 2005. “Tracking, Student Effort, and Academic Achievement.” Sociology of Education 78:27-49.

Bio

William Carbonaro received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin and joined the Notre Dame Department of Sociology as an assistant professor in fall 2000. A winner of a National Academy of Education postdoctoral fellowship in 2003, his research focuses on inequality within the educational system and labor markets. His work has appeared in the highly regarded journals Sociology of Education and the American Sociological Review.

Contact Information

carbonaro_william_small William Carbonaro
Associate Professor; Assistant Director, CREO
1016 Flanner Hall
574.631.3633
wcarbona@nd.edu

Department/affiliation

Sociology

Degrees

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Sociology)
M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Sociology)
M.A., Washington University in St. Louis (Political Science)
B.A.,Washington University in St. Louis (Major – Political Science)

Research interests

Sociology of Education, Social Stratification, Research Methods and Statistics

Honors/awards

 

1997 Award for Outstanding Paper by a Graduate Student, Sociology of Education Section of the American Sociological Association.

2002 Outstanding Reviewer, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis

2003-4 National Academy of Education Post-Doctoral Fellowship

Select publications

 

Carbonaro, William. 2006. “Cross-National Differences in the Skills-Earnings Relationship: The Role of Skill Demands and Labor Market Institutions.” Social Forces 84:1819-1842.

Carbonaro, William. 2006. “Public-Private Differences in Achievement among Kindergarten Students: Differences in Learning Opportunities and Student Outcomes.” American Journal of Education 113:31-65.

Carbonaro, William. 2005. “Tracking, Student Effort, and Academic Achievement.” Sociology of Education 78:27-49.

Covay, Elizabeth, and William Carbonaro. 2010. “Beyond School Walls: Participation in Extracurricular Activities, Classroom Behavior, and Academic Achievement” Sociology of Education  83:20-45.

Carbonaro, William and Elizabeth Covay. 2010. “Sector Differences in Student Experiences and Achievement: An Update.” Sociology of Education 83:160-182.

Carbonaro, William, Brandy Ellison, and Elizabeth Covay. 2011. “Explaining the Gender Gap in College Entry and Completion.” Social Science Research 40: 120-135.

Bio

William Carbonaro is an Associate Professor whose research focuses on inequality within the educational system and in labor markets. His work has appeared in the highly regarded journals Sociology of Education and the American Sociological Review. His on-going research focuses on the effect of peer relationships on student achievement and attainment outcomes.  He is also studying how school credentials are related to employment opportunities for high school and college graduates.