E. Mark Cummings

cummings

Contact information

E. Mark Cummings
Professor and Notre Dame Chair, Department of Psychology
215 Haggar Hall

University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556
574-631-4947
ecummings@nd.edu

Degrees

B.A., Johns Hopkins
M.A., University of California-Los Angeles
Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles

Honors/awards

Fellow, Division 7, American Psychological Association
Fellow, Nanovic Institute for European Studies 
Fellow, Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
Fellow, International Society for Research on Aggression
Arts and Sciences Distinguished Lecturer, Indiana University Purdue University, Fort Wayne
Outstanding Research, Teaching, and Service Award, Department of Psychology, West Virginia University 
Benedum Distinguished Scholar Award, West Virginia University distinction to honor faculty for outstanding research, scholarship or creative activity

Educational research interests

Prof. Cummings’ research interests focus on family factors, especially socioemotional processes, associated with normal development and the development of psychopathology in children. Of particular interest are the influences of the qualities of emotional relations between parents and children, and between the parents, on children’s adjustment. In recent years a series of studies has focused on the effects of forms of marital conflict on children’s functioning and adjustment in a variety of family contexts, including parental depression and abuse. Current concerns include emotional security as a general theoretical model from a developmental psychopathology perspective for children’s development in families, and research-based prevention and parent-educational programs.

Select publications

Schermerhorn, A. C., Cummings, E. M., & Davies, P. T. (in press). "Children’s representations of multiple family relationships: Organizational structure and development in early childhood." Journal of Family Psychology.

Shoppe-Sullivan, S., Schermerhorn, A., & Cummings, E. M. (in press). "Marital conflict and children’s adjustment over time: Testing parental behavioral control, psychological autonomy, and warmth as mediators." Journal of Marriage and the Family.

Goeke-Morey, M. C., Cummings, E. M., & Papp, L. M. (in press). "Children and marital conflict resolution: Implications for emotional security and adjustment." Journal of Family Psychology.

Contact Information

cummings E. Mark Cummings
Notre Dame Endowed Chair in Psychology
215 Haggar Hall
574.631.3404
cummings.10@nd.edu

Department/affiliation

Psychology

Degrees

Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
M.A., University of California, Los Angeles
B.A., Johns Hopkins

Research interests

Family processes and child development

Political violence and children

Preventative interventions for family conflict

Honors/awards

West Virginia University: University Outstanding Teacher Award; Eberly College of Arts and Sciences; Benedum, Distinguished Scholar Award; Arts and Sciences Outstanding Researcher Award; Outstanding Research, Teaching, and Service Award, Department of Psychology

University of Notre Dame:  James A. Burns, C.S.C., Graduate School Award for Excellence in Graduate Education ; Reuben Hill Research and Theory Award, National Council on Family Relations; Research Achievement Award

Select publications

Cummings, E.M., Merrilees, C.E., Schermerhorn, A.C., Goeke-Morey, M.C., Shirlow, P., & Cairns, E. (in press). Longitudinal pathways between political violence and child adjustment: The role of emotional security about the community in Northern Ireland. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology,  39, 213-224. 

Merrilees, C.E., Cairns, E., Goeke-Morey, M.C., Schermerhorn, A.C., Shirlow, P., & Cummings, E.M. (2011).  Associations between mothers’ experience with the Troubles in Northern Ireland and mothers’ and children’s psychological functioning: The moderating role of social identity.  Journal of Community Psychology, 39, 60-75.

Cummings. E. M., Merrilees, C. M., Schermerhorn, A. C., Goeke-Morey, M. C., Shirlow, P., & Cairns, E.  (2010a). Testing a social ecological model for relations between political violence and child adjustment in Northern Ireland.  Development and Psychopathology, 22, 405-418.

Cummings, E. M., Schermerhorn, A. C., Merrilees, C. M., Goeke-Morey, M. C., & Cairns, E.  (2010b). Political violence and child adjustment in Northern Ireland: Testing pathways in a social ecological model including single- and two-parent families.  Developmental Psychology, 46, 827-841.

Cummings, E. M., & Davies, P. T. (2010).  Marital conflict and children: An emotional security perspective. New York and London: The Guilford Press.

Goeke-Morey, M.C., Cummings, E.M., Ellis, K., Merrilees, C.E., Schermerhorn, A.C., Shirlow, P., & Cairns, E. (2009). The differential impact on children of inter- and intra-community violence in Northern Ireland. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 15, 367-383.

Cummings, E.M., Goeke-Morey, M.C., Schermerhorn, A.C., Merrilees, C.E., & Cairns, E. (2009). Children and political violence from a social ecological perspective: Implications from research on children and families in Northern Ireland. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 12, 16-38.

Cummings, E.M., & Davies, P.T. (2002). Effects of marital conflict on children: Recent advances and emerging themes in process-oriented research.  Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43, 31-63.

Cummings, E.M., & Davies, P.T. (1996). Emotional security as a regulatory process in normal development and the development of psychopathology. Development and Psychopathology, 8, 123-139.

Davies, P.T., & Cummings, E.M. (1994). Marital conflict and child adjustment: An emotional security hypothesis.  Psychological Bulletin, 116, 387-411.

Bio

1996-present            Professor, The Notre Dame Chair in Psychology, Psychology Department, University of Notre Dame

2000-2005            Member, Risk, Prevention, and Health Behavior 1 Initial Review Group, National Institute of Mental Health

1985-1996            Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, & Professor, Psychology Department, WVU