Amy Langenkamp

Contact Information

langenkamp2 Amy Langenkamp
O'Shaughnessy Assistant Professor Chair of Educational Studies
CREO / 4077 Jenkins Nanovic Hall
574.631.3611
alangenk@nd.edu
http://creo.nd.edu

Department/affiliation

Sociology

Degrees

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

M.A., University of Texas at Austin

B.A., Villanova University

Research interests

Education

Race/ethnicity

Immigration

Adolescent health and development

Stratification

Life course transitions

Honors/awards

Langenkamp, Amy G. 2011. "Effects of Educational Transitions on Students' Academic Trajectory: A Life Course Perspective." Sociological Perspectives 54(4): 497-520. Winner of the Pacific Sociological Association's 2011 Distinguished Contribution to Sociological Perspectives Award

Select publications

Sutton, April, Chandra Muller, and Amy G. Langenkamp (Forthcoming) "High School Transfer Students and the Transition to College: Timing and the Structure of the School Year."  Sociology of Education.

Langenkamp, Amy G. 2011. "Effects of Educational Transitions on Students' Academic Trajectory: A Life Course Perspective." Sociological Perspectives 54(4): 497-520. Winner of the Pacific Sociological Association's 2011 Distinguished Contribution to Sociological Perspectives Award

Langenkamp, Amy G. 2010. "Academic Vulnerability and Resilience During the Transition to High School: The Role of Social Relationships and District Context." Sociology of Education 83 (1): 1-19.

Langenkamp, Amy G. and Michelle L. Frisco. 2008. "Family Transitions and Adolescent Severe Emotional Distress: The Salience of Family Context." Social Problems 55(2): 238-253.

Bio

Langenkamp's main fields of interest are education, stratification, and life course transitions. Her research explores transitions between major societal institutions and processes of inequality within those institutions. Articles published in journals such as Sociological Perspectives, Sociology of Education, and American Journal of Education document different types of institutional pathways taken by students as they transition, explore how social relationships can become protective factors for low achieving students, and investigate how timing of transitions influence their effect on students' academic trajectory.

Other work, published in Social Problems, explores how parenting can help alleviate emotional distress associated with family structure changes. Langenkamp is currently researching the role of social networks and community organizations in access to postsecondary schooling among immigrant students.